Treating sleep apnea may improve stroke outcomes

If treatment of sleep apnea occurs immediately after a stroke or mini-stroke, new research shows that it may improve patients’ neurological symptoms and daily functioning. More than 20 million adults in the U.S. have obstructive sleep apnea, which has been linked with increased risk for heart attack, hypertension, sudden death, stroke and faster progression of cardiovascular disease.

In a recent study, researchers found that stroke patients who were diagnosed with sleep apnea saw greater improvements in both neurological symptoms and daily ability to function when they used treatment for OSA. This was in comparison to patients with sleep apnea who only received typical medical care.

Sleep apnea and stroke

The study looked at 252 adults that were hospitalized for an ischemic stroke or a mini-stroke, which is known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA). Every participant was screened for sleep apnea. Researchers found that three-quarters of patients had sleep apnea and about two-thirds of those patients with sleep apnea were assigned to one of two interventions that included receiving CPAP therapy, training and encouragement. The other one-third with sleep apnea served as a control group and received usual medical care, plus recommendation at the end of the study to seek CPAP treatment.

Patients’ neurological symptoms and their ability to function in normal activities, such as walking and self care, were assessed at the beginning of the study and six months to one year later. At follow-up, all patients experienced improvement in both neurological symptoms and functional status. However, 59 percent of the patients who used CPAP had neurological symptoms scores at or close to normal. This was in contrast to 38 percent who had just received typical medical care.

If you treat sleep apnea early, the better your stroke outcome will be. Contact Dr. Mayoor Patel to discuss this further. What are some ways to help your patients now and in the future? My guess is that we will need to continue to build upon our relationships with physicians in our communities.

June is National Aphasia Awareness Month

The month of June is National Aphasia Awareness Month. This means, as dental sleep medicine specialists, we need to make sure our patients are staying on top of their health by treating sleep apnea and other symptoms in prevention of stroke. As you know, stroke is the number five cause of death and the leading cause of disability in the U.S. And a stroke can have a variety of communication effects, one of which is aphasia. Stroke is the most common cause of aphasia, which is a language disorder that affects the ability to communicate.

Raise Awareness for Aphasia

Let’s use June to help increase public education around this language disorder and to recognize the numerous people who are currently living with or caring for people with aphasia. The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association continues to increase awareness for aphasia by sharing communication tips, the effects of having aphasia, assistive devices for those with aphasia and more.

The Connection with Sleep Apnea

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women. But what you may not realize is that sleep apnea can lead to heart attacks, which can cause people to die in the middle of the night due to low oxygen or the stress of waking up frequently during sleep.

The relationship between sleep apnea, hypertension, stroke and heart disease is very strong. It is vital that everyone understand this connection to further prevent the development of aphasia as well. Sleep apnea can be easily treated to prevent stroke, aphasia and other comorbidities. It is more important than ever to receive continuing education to further improve your patients’ well-being and health.

When patients receive up-to-date health care, you are taking preventative steps, but we still have a ways to go. Start today by educating your patients on the risks of untreated sleep apnea, stroke and aphasia.

Aphasia, Stroke and Sleep Apnea

The month of June was set aside as National Aphasia Awareness Month, which means making sure your patients are staying on top of their health by treating sleep apnea and other symptoms in prevention of stroke. As you are aware, stroke is the number five cause of death and the leading cause of disability in the United States. A stroke can have a variety of communication effects, one of which is aphasia. Stroke is the most common cause of aphasia, which is a language disorder that affects the ability to communicate.

Raise Awareness for Aphasia

With June at an end, we can still continue to raise awareness for both stroke and aphasia. June was set as National Aphasia Awareness Month to help increase public education around this language disorder and to recognize the numerous people who are currently living with or caring for people with aphasia. The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association continues to increase awareness for aphasia by sharing communication tips, the effects of having aphasia, assistive devices for those with aphasia and more.

A Connection with Sleep Apnea

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women. But what you may not realize is that sleep apnea can lead to heart attacks, which can cause people to die in the middle of the night due to low oxygen or the stress of waking up frequently during sleep.

As stated previously, heart disease is the leading cause of death in America, while stroke takes fourth place for the cause of death and leading cause of disability with high blood pressure being a major risk in both conditions. The relationship between sleep apnea, hypertension, stroke and heart disease is very strong, which makes it vital that everyone understand this connection as to further prevent the development of aphasia as well.

Sleep apnea can be easily treated to prevent stroke, aphasia and other comorbidities, which is why it is more important than ever to receive continuing education to further improve your patients’ well-being and health.
Every time you provide your patients with up-to-date health care, you are taking preventative steps, but we still have a ways to go and we need your help! Get started today by educating your patients on the risks of untreated sleep apnea, stroke and aphasia. I know June is over, but it is never too late to educate your patients.