Sleep disorders common among non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients, study says

Let’s take a look at another connection with sleep breathing disorders. Adults with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) suffer from sleep disorders stemming from less oxygen in the blood, according to a study.

What is bronchiectasis though? It is a chronic condition characterized by abnormal widening of airways. This can lead to their destruction, a buildup of excess mucus and a decline in lung function.  

Sleep orders, specifically obstructive sleep apnea, affect 45 percent of the world’s population. Of this, about three to seven percent of young men and about 2.5 percent of young women in the Western world have sleep apnea. A risk increases in people with respiratory disorders.

Despite confirmed links between a number of respiratory diseases and sleep disorders, states the study, the relationship between bronchiectasis and sleep disorders have still not been investigated extensively. For this reason, this research team looked to dive into the connection.

What were the results?

It was found that 41 percent of patients had sleep apnea associated with low blood oxygen levels and 71 percent snored. On top of that, 53 percent of patients experienced excessive daytime sleepiness, a percentage higher than the general population.

This study brings to our attention just how important it is to complete further research on various connections with sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea. By conducting further research and expanding our education, we can further provide our patients with even better care.

What conditions have you noticed a link with sleep apnea? Is there adequate research out there?

How is Your Social Network?

First, do you have a social network? Are you on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Google+? If not, now is the time to get those up and running as soon as possible. The availability of a social network is the easiest option for reaching your patients. And what makes it even better is its free to create!

If you already have an active social network for your practice, let’s re-evaluate how you are using it. From sharing educational information and blog posts to updating your patients on your practice, your social network is a vital go-between for you and your patients. Let’s take a look at what you should be doing with your social network.

Pay attention to when you’re posting online

Timing is everything when it comes to your social network.  When you are thinking about when to post something, ask yourself when your patients go online. Or, what’s even better is to ask when your staff goes online the most.  

If you can gain a better understanding of when people are utilizing the Internet, you can plan out your sharing and posting. For example, most people will go on a social channel when they first wake up in the morning, at lunch time, after work and then again before bed. If you stick to a time around those, you can improve your outreach to your patients.

Pay attention to what you’re sharing online

What you are sharing on your social network? Is it relatable? Is it something they want to know? Think about questions that your patients frequently ask you and utilize information that answers those questions. You can help to educate your patients in dental sleep medicine and craniofacial pain by:

  • Answering common questions patients might be answering in the office, online.
  • Giving patients educational resources to help them make educated decisions regarding their health and wellbeing.
  • Sharing images that help explain certain aspects of dental sleep medicine and craniofacial pain.
  • Giving tips that help patients better understand sleep apnea and TMD.

Facebook, Twitter and Google+ are each available as a way to educate your patients on your specific area of interest. From articles throughout the Internet to your own educational blogs, social media channels are available for you to reach your patients in any way possible. Even if you are simply announcing a new member to your already expansive dental team, your patients want to know what is going on at your practice. Let your patients into your practice and let them know you are available and listening to their needs.

 

Untreated Sleep Apnea is Linked to Metabolic and Cardiovascular Stress

A new study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism shows that if sleep apnea is left untreated, even for just a few days, can increase blood sugar and fat levels, stress hormones and blood pressure. This study also adds support for the consistent use of CPAP, which can lead us to discussing the further importance of oral appliance therapy for those that are CPAP non-compliant.

An improved study, results

Previous studies focusing on metabolic and patients with OSA, typically collected data while participants were awake. As a result, this only showed us one area of how OSA affects a person’s overall health and wellbeing. In this new study, participants slept in a sleep laboratory at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. Here, their brain waves, blood oxygen levels, heart rates and breathing were recorded every night. Their eye and leg movements were also observed and recorded.

Blood samples were taken from 31 patients with moderate to severe OSA and had a history of regular CPAP use for two nights. Samples were drawn every 20 minutes starting at nine at night until six in the morning. The researchers found that CPAP withdrawal caused:

  • Recurrence of OSA associated with sleep disruption.
  • Elevated heart rate.
  • Reduced blood oxygen.

This withdrawal also led to increased levels of free fatty acids, glucose, cortisol and blood pressure during sleep. The more severe the OSA was in a participant, the more these areas increased.  

Importance of treatment for sleep apnea

While this study emphasized the importance of CPAP therapy for OSA patients to prevent metabolic and cardiovascular consequences, this can be the same for oral appliance therapy. This is especially true for OSA patients who have a hard time tolerating CPAP. ORal appliance therapy can help provide proper treatment for OSA while also preventing complications.

As dental sleep medicine specialists, we have the unique opportunity to provide our patients with treatment that works and is comfortable. Let’s continue to remain ahead of the treatment of sleep apnea with oral appliance therapy and the benefits it continues to offer.

 

Women Have Trouble Sleeping

Millions of Americans have a hard time falling or staying asleep at night. This is especially true for women more than men. According to a professor at the Yale School of Medicine, insomnia is more common in females and can begin early on in women in their teens or 20s.

Research has shown that women are more likely than men to experience insomnia and other sleep disorders. In fact, they are about 1.5 times more likely to have insomnia. A 2006 Canadian study found women were 1.3 to 1.8 times more likely than men to have insomnia. And in a 2007 National Sleep Foundation poll of Americans, 60 percent of women between the ages of 18 and 24 only got a good night’s sleep a few times a week while 52 percent of men only had a good night’s sleep a few days a week.

Why is this the case?

Women have a greater likelihood of developing insomnia and other sleep disorders because of tremendous changes in hormonal levels experienced from the time they begin menstruating to menopause. Pregnant women may also have trouble sleeping due to increased urination, restless leg syndrome, acid reflux, leg cramps and other discomforts. And for women going through menopause, their sleep can be disturbed by hot flashes and night sweats that might last for years.

It is also possible for women to be kept up at night due to non-hormonal factors. For example, more men snore. That means more women have to listen to that snoring, which can make falling asleep even more difficult. Additionally, men are more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea, which can interrupt women during sleep due to pauses in breathing and potential snoring.

The reasons for insomnia and other sleep disorders needs to be explored. It also needs to go beyond just offering sleep aids. Additionally, many people might self-medicate with alcohol, which as you know, can worsen symptoms of sleep apnea and cause even more inconsistent sleep.

We need to help our patients get a better night’s sleep every night, no matter what their sleep disorder is. By asking the right questions and paying attention to their complaints, you might be just what they need to begin their journey toward healthy sleep and wellbeing.