Effect of CPAP use on blood pressure in patients with sleep apnea

The use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the most commonly used treatment option for sleep apnea. While it can be a successful form of treatment, not all patients wear the mask throughout the night. However, a new study published in the Journal of Hypertension shows that use of the CPAP machine did have a long-term impact on a patient’s health by reducing blood pressure.

With this information, we can further look at the long-term impact of oral appliance therapy for the health of our patients and a reduction in blood pressure and hypertension. It is apparent that the use of treatment of sleep apnea is key in protecting patients and their health in the long-run.  

The impact of treatment

This study looked to evaluate the impact of long-term use of CPAP on clinic and ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant hypertension (RHT) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). It observed 66 patients with RHT and moderate/severe OSA, using CPAP for at least a year. Clinic BP and 24-hour BP were obtained before and after follow-up.

The results showed that the average use of CPAP treatment was five hours per night with 78 percent using it at least four hours per night. There was a significant reduction of 24-hour and daytime systolic ambulatory BP. And controlled BP increased from 39 percent to 57 percent.

It was concluded that the treatment of OSA with long-term use of CPAP significantly reduces BP among patients with resistant hypertension. This is especially true with uncontrolled ambulatory BP at the baseline. What this means is that treatment is essential in not only improving OSA, but hypertension and BP too.

And while this study does not cover oral appliance therapy, we can assume the same can be said for continued use of an oral appliance. This is definitely something we need to keep an eye on and look further into. But it is clear that treatment of sleep apnea is essential to overall health and well-being.

The Sleep Apnea Device Market has a Bright Future

I have some exciting news to share! The sleep apnea device market has a bright future and that’s great news for us dentists! So, what’s the outlook? Well, by 2020 it is estimated to reach a worth of about $5.3 billion. In the report “Sleep Apnea Devices Market by Product, Diagnostic (PSG, Pulse Oximeter), Therapeutic [CPAP, APAP, BPAP, Masks (Full Face Mask), Oral Appliances (Mandibular Advancement Device)], End User (Home Care Settings, Hospitals) – Analysis & Global Forecasts to 2020”, the major market drivers, restraints/challenges, and opportunities were analyzed and studied.

In the report, as presented by marketsandmarkets.com, the global sleep apnea devices market is studied for the forecast period of 2015-2020. As of 2015, the market was at $3.7 billion, but by 2020, the market is expected to reach $5.3 billion at a CAGR of 7.2% during the forecast period. With 2015 being the highest growth of the market, we will continue to see a growth spurt at the highest rate yet.

A Look at the Forecast

The regions for this study included the following areas:

  • North America
  • Europe
  • Asia-Pacific
  • The Rest of the World (Latin America, Central America, and Africa)

We saw North America with the largest share in the sleep apnea market in 2015, followed by Europe and Asia-Pacific. However, the European market has projections to grow at the highest CAGR rate during the target between now and 2020.

ResMed, a major player in the market, continues to observe a strong focus on innovation. Through such a rich pipeline of innovative products in the market opens up so many opportunities for treatment of sleep apnea.

Remain ahead of the game by providing the best treatment options for sleep apnea through oral appliance therapy. Together we can help our patients get a better night’s sleep. To learn more about sleep apnea and available treatment options, visit www.mpateldds.com. You can also view upcoming lectures to help you continue to learn more about this growing industry.

Give Your Patients the Gift of a Better Night’s Sleep

Let’s face it, snoring is not attractive, nor is it fun. When a person or their partner snores, it can significantly interrupt their night’s sleep, causing tense relationships. To help your patients give the gift of a better night’s sleep, it is important for your dental office to begin continuing education in the area of dental sleep medicine. Currently, it has been shown that 40% of the American population snores while as many as 16% has diagnosable sleep apnea. With more than 80% of sleep breathing disorders going undiagnosed, your practice can take the next step toward helping your patients and their family members get a better night’s sleep.

What to do

The first thing you should do is to educate yourself on the practice and particulars of dental sleep medicine today. By taking an introductory course on Dental Sleep Medicine you can get a robust introduction to the field of dental sleep medicine. There are several organizations that offer courses and annual meetings to meet the continuing education needs for integrating dental sleep medicine into your practice.

Next, it is important to create a relationship with your local sleep physician. While this may be out of your comfort zone, it is an essential part of gaining the resources you need to give your patients the gift of a better night’s sleep. Sleep physicians are the medical providers who diagnose sleep-disordered breathing and are responsible for the overall care of the patient. As an effective and successful dentist, you will work very closely with your patients’ sleep physician to provide optimal care.

Begin Now

Within your dental practice you can begin to integrate dental sleep therapies. You can do this by creating sleep-focused conversations with your patients. This can be as simple as adding a question to your hygienist’s initial consultation with the patient, such as Do you, or anyone in your family, snore? By adding this simple question, you can help uncover a large population that is in need of care and may not even realize it.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is heritable and can often be found in children of snoring parents, so taking charge now is important in their overall health. Asking a simple question at a patient’s appointment can be all you need to offer a successful treatment plan so they can get a better night’s sleep! Your patients’ families will be thanking you for this gift that keeps on giving!

Dentists: Why Treat Sleep Apnea?

As a dentist have you ever thought about treating sleep apnea in your dental office? While it may seem like a long shot, dental sleep medicine continues to grow in importance each year because of a dentist’s unique ability to notice oral symptoms. Many patients who do not respond to traditional treatment will often benefit from oral appliances that are provided by dentists.

The Expertise

It is estimated that more than 18 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea. This happens when a person’s airway gets blocked while they are sleeping. Often, this will happen because a person is overweight and additional tissue thickens the wall of the windpipe, making it more difficult to keep open. And, sometimes it is because the throat muscles relax more than normal.  A long, bony neck can also make for a narrower airway, which leads to sleep apnea as well.

The most common treatment option is the use of a CPAP machine. However, many patients are non-compliant to this form of treatment and do not want to undergo surgery. When this occurs, their best option may be oral appliance therapy, which is provided by a dentist. By wearing an oral appliance, it opens the airway by pushing the lower jaw forward and is more comfortable than a CPAP machine.

The Opportunity to Complete Continuing Education

As a dentist you can easily learn more about treating sleep apnea through advanced education courses and lectures. For instance, as a dental sleep medicine expert, Dr. Mayoor Patel participates in numerous lectures a year to further improve dental practices and their treatment options.

While many dentists can treat sleep apnea, it is important to receive the best education and experience in order to properly treat your patients. Dentists see their patients twice a year and are given the unique opportunity to properly screen patients and recommend treatment long before they may ever visit their regular physician.

With the unique opportunity to diagnose and treat sleep apnea, as a dentist you should consider continuing your learning and expanding your practice. To read more about this “unique opportunity,” you can read an article by Dr. Patel on Sleep Review.

Contact Dr. Mayoor Patel for more information about continuing your education in Dental Sleep Medicine and understanding how you, a dentist, should look into treating sleep apnea in your dental practice.