Attend a future lecture for improved knowledge

Education is the future. If you are searching for was to advance your practice or if you are looking for further guidance for your dental sleep medicine and/or craniofacial pain practice, lectures are available. By attending a lecture, you will take the necessary steps toward improving the services you offer while providing your patients with the care they deserve to live healthy, happy lives.

For your reference, take a look at some of my upcoming lectures:

 

August 11-12, 2017

Topic: Dental Sleep Medicine

Location Toronto, Canada

September 2, 2017

Topic: Dental Sleep Medicine Study Club

Location: Johns Creek GA

September 15-16, 2017

Topic: Pinpoint the Pain: TMD, Cranofacial Pain

Location: Phoenix, AZ

September 29-30, 2017

Topic: Sleep & Pain Mini Residency Session 2

Location: Atlanta, GA

October 5-6, 2017

Topic: Dentistry and dental marketing International conference

Location: Las vegas, NV

October 19, 2017

Topic: ADA 2017 Meeting -Sleep Medicine Panel: Ask the Experts

Location: Atlanta, GA

October 13-14, 2017

Topic: Advancing your Dental Sleep Medicine Practice

Location: Atlanta, GA

November 3-4, 2017

Topic: Dental Sleep Medicine and TMD

Location: London, England

November 10-11, 2017

Topic: Sleep, TMD, & Craniofacial Pain Symposium

Location: Las Vegas, NV

December 1-2, 2017

Topic: Sleep & Pain Mini Residency Session 3

Location: Atlanta, GA

You can also view other upcoming lectures by visiting my website. Choose the lectures that align with your practice’s needs and don’t forget to bring your staff with you! Some of these courses would be great for the whole team!

Bring Your Hygienist with to Your Next Seminar

Think of this scenario: you (the dentist) just got back from a great seminar in let’s say Las Vegas. You’re so pumped up and excited to get to work, but what about your staff? While you can try your hardest to bring the enthusiasm to your office, it’s just not the same. So, who spends the most time and has a better rapport with patients? Hygienists do! For your next seminar series think about bringing your hygienist next time. Together you can be excited and better understand the roles associated with Dental Sleep Medicine, Craniofacial Pain and other advanced areas of dentistry.

The Hygienist’s Role

In the last 10 years, dentists and hygienists have become more involved in the treatment of sleep apnea, craniofacial pain, TMD, and other advanced areas of dentistry. Since patients visit their dentist more often than they visit their family doctor, a dental hygienist plays a critical role in screening patients for these advanced areas of dentistry.

From sleep breathing disorders to craniofacial pain, a hygienist can ask the appropriate questions each time a patient visits your office. And, if your hygienists don’t know what to look out for, then how can they ask the right questions to help you provide the right treatment? They can’t unless they accompany you to lectures and seminars throughout the year. By remaining up-to-date, your hygienist can work with you each step of the way.

A dental hygienist can play a vital role in your dental office if you provide them with appropriate education. Whether it is with you at a seminar, or on their own, continuing education for not only yourself, but your hygienist, too, is key.

Dentists and their hygienists work hand-in-hand for the treatment of sleep apnea, craniofacial pain, TMD, and other conditions. Start today by signing your hygienist up for a future seminar–both with you and on their own. If you have any questions about how to incorporate this teamwork into advanced areas of dentistry, such as dental sleep medicine and craniofacial pain, please contact me.

 

There’s a New Definition of Dental Sleep Medicine

Attention! Attention! There’s a new definition of Dental Sleep Medicine (DSM)–wait what? I know, I thought the same thing when I read this article. However, it did bring to mind some valuable information we can utilize from here on out for DSM. To begin with, dental sleep medicine is an extension of dentistry in which we an provide appropriate services for the treatment of sleep apnea. So, what is this new definition?

The New Definition

Dental Sleep Medicine’s new definition goes above and beyond sleep apnea. This new definition takes the role of sleep apnea treatment and takes it one step further by incorporating pain into the equation. DSM is the discipline concerned with the study of the oral and maxillofacial causes and consequences of sleep-related problems.

This helps to broaden the subject area to other problems in dentistry, such as orofacial or craniofacial pain, bruxism, and other areas. These disorders have been touched on as their own, but what about together?

Where to Begin

This “new” definition of dental sleep medicine can improve the services offered at your practice. To begin 2017 out on the right foot, I am excited to announce that on January 20-21 my first lecture will be “ABC – Airway, Bruxism & Craniofacial Pain”. This lecture will dive into this “new definition” of dental sleep medicine so you can continue to expand your dental practice services and expertise.

Take the next step in providing proper care to your patients and by educating yourself in the New Year. With the availability of the ABC lecture and others, I can work with you to continue your education.

Searching for the Right Continuing Education Courses for Sleep Apnea

I recently read an article in Sleep Review about Dental Schools receiving a failing grade. While this might be accurate, I wouldn’t give the schools a failing grade. What dental schools do is educate dentists to provide general dentistry. However, we can change this failing grade to a passing grade with the availability of continuing education courses. Let’s take a stand and further advance ourselves and our practices by understanding how to take our dental education to a new level of success with continuing education courses.

What Research Says

According to researchers, there is an absence of sleep-disordered breathing education for dental school students. With the increase in a need for proper obstructive sleep apnea treatment, dentists remain in a unique opportunity to screen patients and recommend treatment. While dentists can’t diagnose, they maintain the ability to notice the first signs of sleep apnea, which allows them to refer to a sleep physician for proper diagnosis.

The issue that remains is that when dentists graduate from dental school, they are not prepared for the added services of dental sleep medicine. It has been shown that less than 3 hours are dedicated to OSA and other sleep-related disorders for dental students. And, only a handful of postdoctoral programs are available that include such courses to help improve the offering of dental sleep medicine.

What Needs to Change

In order to further improve dental students’ understanding of all areas of dentistry, we must provide our students with the education they need to better serve their patients. While I don’t have a set answer for how many hours are needed to be spend on the subject of obstructive sleep apnea, there is one thing we do know–continuing education is available.

The availability of continuing education courses in dental sleep medicine allow dentists to continue to advance their knowledge in dentistry. While many dentists will go on to remain in general dentistry, others search for ways to further their practice and services available. This is where continuing education comes into play.

Continuing Education

Are you ready to continue your education well past what you learned in dental school? While less than 3 hours are dedicated to dental sleep medicine in school, there are options out there to help dentists. The biggest advantage dentists have is the opportunity to advance their expertise with quality education seminars and courses from accredited associations such as Nierman Practice Management.

Lead by experienced dental sleep medicine specialists such as myself, we continue to help dentists and their teams advance their practices to offer sleep apnea services. And, while researchers has stated that “without such a component in their academic career, the researchers explain, dentists must rely on courses offered by manufacturers of oral appliances and information gleaned from medical literature and industry meetings,” there’s more out there.

Today, numerous courses are available through accredited associations and led by experienced dentists who are currently practicing within the field of dental sleep medicine. Visit my lectures page or Nierman Practice Management to learn more about your options for continuing education.