For further guidance, check out this educational book on TMD

In November “Take a Bite Out of Pain: A Journey to Overcoming Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMD)” was released and available for purchase. It is exciting to have both a book on TMD and sleep apnea for further outreach and education on topics that are often overlooked. This new educational book serves many purposes. It can be put on display at your office for your patients or it can be gifted to a friend or family member that might be suffering from pain.

This educational book is now available for purchase at Lulu.com, Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Pick your favorite website to go to and purchase it!

What can you expect from the book?

I wrote this book in collaboration with Sara Berg, my writer. As many of you know, she has been writing for me for almost five years now and this is our second book together. We decided to write about pain and TMD to better educate patients on these symptoms and what to do. As dentists, we are in a unique position to help our patients feel better, so why not continue to provide them with the resources they need to better understand their condition?

To help you get a better understanding of what the book is about, here is a brief description:

“Pain should never be ignored. Whether it is pain in your jaw, or what seems like a headache, don’t ignore the discomfort. Ignoring pain would be a waste of time, leading to further complications with your health.

Search for the underlying cause of your pain with help from qualified dentists that treat such cases. Finding the source of your nagging pain will help you continue on with your daily activities—hopefully eliminating any discomfort present.

Don’t just “put up with” pain—seek proper treatment. Pain is a complex and complicated symptom tuned by your brain, as it triggers every painful sensation. Are you just going to sit there and wish the pain away? No, absolutely not.

Educate yourself on the cause or causes, and treatment options. Pain isn’t a singular problem, it can be so much more.”
I look forward to hearing your thoughts and I hope that you utilize this book to help your patients before, during or after their visits to your dental office!

Long-term treatment for adolescents with TMJ pain

I want to take a moment to discuss a study I was looking at the other day. This study looked at the long-term treatment outcome for adolescents with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. I find this interesting because it is a subject that doesn’t always get a lot of attention.

What the study says

In this study, their waim was to evaluate long-term, self-perceived outcomes in adulthood for individuals treated as adolescents for TMD. To find this they looked at two previous randomized controlled trials.

There were 116 participants with 81 percent female and were treated for frequent TMD pain in previous years. The treatment for these individuals consisted of an oral appliance or relaxation training. For those that participated, they answered a questionnaire based on their experience of “frequency and intensity of TMD pain impaired chewing capacity and daily social activities, help-seeking behavior and treatment, general health, other pain and depressive symptoms,” according to the study.

Older participants reported lower levels of frequency and intensity of TMD pain, impairment and depressive symptoms. They also reported better general health. Females, which were the majority of the participants, reported more frequent and more intense pain associated with the TMJ. They also reported greater impairment and more often reported other pain compared to males.

What did we learn from this?

From this study we understand that adolescents treated with oral appliance therapy showed a somewhat better sustained improvement over the extended follow-up period than those treated with relaxation therapy. This highlights the need to pay closer attention to these groups. By looking closer at this information we can extend or create different treatment plans to improve patient outcomes.

Keep an eye out for adolescent patients that might be experiencing TMJ pain and think about the long-term goals. By helping this patient population, we can better equip them for adulthood.

The Painful Truth About TMD and How to Help

As you already know, temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) refer to a cluster of conditions that are often characterized by pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or its surrounding tissues. The surrounding tissues might include the neck, head and even shoulders. Conditions involving the TMJ are so common among the adult population that up to 75 percent show at least one sign of TMD upon examination. Let’s take a look at some of the instances in which TMD can cause further complications and how to educate your patients.

Further Complications

Evidence continues to be available about TMD and how it can be worsened by other conditions. Today, it has been shown that anxiety, stress, and other emotional disturbances may worsen TMD. Some of the common signs of TMD include:

  • Jaw pain
  • Limited or painful jaw movements
  • Headaches
  • Neck pain or stiffness
  • Clicking or grating within the joint
  • Inability to open mouth without pain

It has been shown that about 55 percent of patients with chronic headaches who were referred to a neurologist actually have signs of TMD. Without the education on TMD, signs and symptoms often go overlooked and no treatment can be found.

As a dentist, you can put an end to the misdiagnosis of TMD by completing further education. You can also educate your patients on self-care techniques and referral for non-invasive treatment should be considered [1].

Improvement with Treatment

Signs and symptoms of TMD improve over time with at-home care, and with oral appliance therapy from the dental office. Previous studies have even show that as many as 50% of patients improve in one year and 85% improve completely in three years. Encourage conservative treatment before any invasive options are considered. It is important to treat your patients properly without causing further complications.

Contact my office to learn more about TMD and available treatment options, as well as upcoming lectures for continuing your education.

 

 

 

 

1. Lindsay, J. (2016). TMJ Disorder-The Painful (but Helpful) Truth. Pain.

Help TMD Patients Eat Right

Without proper nutrition your patients increase the risk of either gaining or losing weight, or suffering from nutritional deficiencies due to the pain caused by TMD. And through this, it can lead to other health problems. When it comes to maintaining your patients’ health and diet, it is important to remind them to eat fruits, vegetables, starches, protein and dairy, but to also be mindful of their TMD along the way.

A Background on TMD

Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are complex and poorly understood, and are characterized by pain in the jaw joint and/or surrounding tissues and limitation in jaw movements. These problems can affect a person’s ability to chew and swallow foods, while limiting how wide he or she can open their mouth. The immediate causes of TMD conditions such as:

  • Injury
  • Arthritis
  • Muscle problems
  • Autoimmune and connective tissue disease
  • Developmental conditions
  • Movement disorders affecting the jaw

Whatever your patient’s situation may be, it is clear that TMD alone can impact the quality of life and lead to poor nutrition if the jaw pain and oral disability seriously affects their diet.

Encourage Patients to Eat Right

Many people who suffer from TMD tend to struggle with determining what to eat in order to maintain a proper weight and ensure adequate protein, vitamin and mineral status. Food choices will vary depending on the amount of pain your patients experience and their ability to open the mouth, chew and swallow. For those who are able to adequately open their mouths and have minimal pain, a soft or easy to chew diet will work well. A soft diet is defined as food that requires minimal chewing, including:

  • Dairy/Dairy Alternatives: Smooth yogurt, soft cheeses, milk, custard, puddings, and soymilk.
  • Grains: Soft bread, corn bread, muffins without seeds or nuts, soft tortillas, pancakes, and quinoa.
  • Fruits: Canned fruits, bananas, ripe melon, baked apples, fruit juice, and fruit smoothies.
  • Vegetables: Cooked carrots, squash, zucchini, spinach, kale or other greens, avocados, green beans, and cooked pumpkin.
  • Protein Foods: Soft-cooked chicken or turkey with gravy, meatloaf, fish, deli meats, meatballs, tuna, refried beans, and smooth nut butters.
  • Soups: Cream-based soups, tomato soup, and broth-based soups.
  • Desserts: Soft cakes, cobblers and pies, frozen yogurt, sherbet, milkshakes and puddings.

If your patient is unable to tolerate a soft diet, a pureed diet may be a better option. Some examples of foods that can be included in a pureed diet are:

  • Dairy/Dairy Alternatives: Smooth yogurt, soft cheeses, milk, custard, puddings, and soymilk.
  • Grains: Bread that has been soaked into a dissolvable consistency, pureed pasta, hot cereals, grits, and mashed potatoes.
  • Fruits: Applesauce, mashed ripe bananas, fruit juice, and seedless jam/jelly.
  • Vegetables: Mashed white or sweet potatoes, pureed carrots, beets, beans, peas, creamed corn and hummus.
  • Protein Foods: Pureed meats, pureed/scrambled eggs, crustless quiche, egg custards, and yogurt-based smoothies.
  • Soups: Soups that are smooth or that have been put through the blender.
  • Desserts: Puddings, custards, dessert soups, gelatin, and fondue.

By keeping a list of foods they can eat and foods not to eat, it is a good place for patients to start in ensuring they are eating the right foods. For your patients suffering from TMD it is important to guide them in choosing the right foods to eat. If you are not sure what to recommend your patients to eat, contact Dr. Mayoor Patel for more information in helping to protect your patients while minimizing jaw pain.