Insomnia and sleep apnea can lead to premature birth, study says

With new research becoming available, it is important that we remain aware of new connections with sleep apnea. In a new study published in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, it was found that insomnia and sleep apnea can lead to premature births. And, from this, it augments the prevalence of serious health-related issues in preterm babies, such as cerebral palsy.

Premature births that occur before the 37th week of pregnancy are a major problem worldwide. About 15 million premature babies are born in the world every year, which places them at an increased risk of death from birth-related complications. Aside from cerebral palsy, preterm children can experience developmental disabilities, hearing impairments and other health problems because they were unable to fully develop in the womb.

The connection with sleep disorders

In an analysis of three million pregnant women from 2007 to 2012 in California, it showed that better sleep could minimize the number of premature births. Researchers analyzed anonymous records that contained medical history for these women about their pregnancies and the delivery of their babies.

It found that about 2,300 women had been diagnosed with a sleep disorder during pregnancy–insomnia and sleep apnea were the most frequent problems. From this information, it was found that insomnia increased the risk of preterm birth by 30 percent while sleep apnea increased it by 40 percent.

The study also found that 5.3 percent of women with sleep disorders gave birth before 34 weeks compared to 2.9 percent among women without sleep disorders. Understanding this relationship is important because there is a need for interventions to minimize preterm birth rates.

Unfortunately, many times pregnant women often go undiagnosed, which is why it is important to seek a diagnosis for proper care. Results from this study can help alert physicians and dentists to this potential danger.