Sleep disorders common among non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients, study says

Let’s take a look at another connection with sleep breathing disorders. Adults with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) suffer from sleep disorders stemming from less oxygen in the blood, according to a study.

What is bronchiectasis though? It is a chronic condition characterized by abnormal widening of airways. This can lead to their destruction, a buildup of excess mucus and a decline in lung function.  

Sleep orders, specifically obstructive sleep apnea, affect 45 percent of the world’s population. Of this, about three to seven percent of young men and about 2.5 percent of young women in the Western world have sleep apnea. A risk increases in people with respiratory disorders.

Despite confirmed links between a number of respiratory diseases and sleep disorders, states the study, the relationship between bronchiectasis and sleep disorders have still not been investigated extensively. For this reason, this research team looked to dive into the connection.

What were the results?

It was found that 41 percent of patients had sleep apnea associated with low blood oxygen levels and 71 percent snored. On top of that, 53 percent of patients experienced excessive daytime sleepiness, a percentage higher than the general population.

This study brings to our attention just how important it is to complete further research on various connections with sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea. By conducting further research and expanding our education, we can further provide our patients with even better care.

What conditions have you noticed a link with sleep apnea? Is there adequate research out there?