Learning More

When it comes to maintaining an up-to-date dental practice, it is important to receive continuing education through classes, lectures and webinars. With a variety of options available for expanding your knowledge and your practice’s expertise, you can continue to improve your services and how to help your patients’ various oral health care needs. To help you and your practice, Dr. Mayoor Patel lectures and, most recently, participates in webinars. Let’s take a look at upcoming lectures and the latest webinar.

Upcoming Lectures

To learn more about various areas of Dental Sleep Medicine, Dr. Patel will be lecturing throughout the year. You can easily find out more information about his upcoming lectures by visiting his website.  Dr. Mayoor Patel has upcoming lectures in both October and November:

October 24 – 25, 2014

Location: Atlanta Sleep School, Atlanta, GA

Topic: Sleep Medicine for the Dental Practice

November 14, 2014

Location: Patterson Dental, San Diego, CA

Topic: Dental Sleep Medicine

Each lecture allows Dr. Patel to work with dentists to better understand various areas of Dental Sleep Medicine. As an end result, dentists can continue to advance their dental practice by utilizing these new services. Dr. Patel is also available to work with each practice individually through his consultation services for more personalized help.

Upcoming Webinar

Additionally, Dr. Mayoor Patel is excited to team up with Sleep Review editor, Sree Roy, and a team of expert presenters in a free webcast on Thursday, October 16th at 2:00 p.m. EDT/11:00 a.m. PDT. This webcast was put together to explain various options for incorporating dental sleep medicine specialists into a sleep medicine team. The webcast is approximately an hour long live presentation that will feature practitioners who have found mutually beneficial success –for both the physician and dentist –to working together to benefit patients. Throughout the webcast, you will have the opportunity to ask your own questions to each presenter.

Speaking alongside Dr. Mayoor Patel are the following:

  • Harold A. Smith, DDS – President-elect, American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine
  • Scott Craig, CEO – Chief Executive Officer, Midwest Dental Sleep Center
  • Daniel G. Klauer, DDS, DABCP – Clinical director, TMJ & Sleep Therapy Centres International, TMJ & Sleep Therapy Cenre of Northern Indiana

 
To register and learn more about “Incorporating Dentistry into a Sleep Medicine Team,” you can visit the webcast registration page here.

Dr. Mayoor Patel encourages dentists and physicians to join the webinar to learn more information about Dental Sleep Medicine, as well as the opportunity to ask any questions they might have.

Orofacial Pain and Oral Health

Orofacial pain involves the chewing muscles or temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Problems associate with orofacial pain may include TMJ discomfort, muscle spasms in the head, neck and jaw, migraines, cluster or frequent headaches; or pain with the teeth, face or jaw.

Each day a person swallows approximately 2,000 times. When you swallow, it causes the upper and lower teeth to come together and push against the skull. Patients who have an unstable bite, missing teeth or poorly aligned teeth can have trouble because the muscles are working harder to bring the teeth together, causing strain and pain. When a patient experiences pain, it can also be caused by clenching or grinding teeth, trauma to the head and neck, or poor ergonomics.

Treating Orofacial Pain

As a dentist, you can offer your patients a variety of treatments that can help alleviate a patient’s orofacial pain. One treatment option is an oral appliance, which might also be called an orthotic, or splint. An oral appliance is worn over the teeth until the bite can be stabilized. However, permanent correction may require reshaping teeth, building crowns, orthodontics or a permanent appliance for the mouth. Another option may be physical therapy, counseling, relaxation training or massage therapy.

Some other ways to alleviate pain might include:

  • Place an ice pack on the painful area for 10 minutes at a time, 3 or 4 times a day
  • Eat softer foods
  • Avoid chewing gum and ice
  • Cut food into smaller pieces
  • Keep upper and lower teeth slightly apart at rest by keeping your tongue between your teeth
  • Sleep on your back
  • Don’t rest your hand on your chin

 
Dentists play a key role in treating orofacial pain so that patients can live pain free once again.  To learn more about how you can help relieve your patients’ pain, contact us today!

Dental Sleep Medicine is “In”

The doctor is usually “in,” but with advancements in dentistry and technology, we can now see that Dental Sleep Medicine is “in.” With the growing need for Dental Sleep Medicine and treatment of sleep apnea, it is important for dentists to expand their experience and knowledge of this area of dentistry.

Stand Out

When it comes to a successful dental practice, it is important to stand out. As you may know, patients are drawn to practices that provide superior, unique services and the availability of Dental Sleep Medicine can be your key to standing out. Your general services are often a “given,” which means they are expected, but what can you do to expand on that?

The idea and availability of Dental Sleep Medicine is a great way to expand on your practice and engage with your patients. We all want to get a better night’s sleep, but that can sometimes be difficult if your patient suffers from sleep apnea. As a dentist you have a unique advantage because you can identify symptoms and triggers initially. From this, you can recommend a visit to the physician in which you can work side by side in proper treatment.

What are Patients Looking for?

You may or may not already know what patients are looking for, but it is important to make sure you understand it. We know that over 20 years ago, the most popular form of dentistry was teeth whitening. As dentistry advances, the popularity of different areas continues to change. Today, many dentists have seen that Dental Sleep Medicine has replaced teeth whitening in popularity and necessity. By knowing this, you can continue to improve your practice and what makes it “stand out” to patients.

By offering Dental Sleep Medicine in your dental practice, you can attract many new patients, while standing out among other offices. Attend classes, lectures and other training sessions to learn more about Dental Sleep Medicine and be the “go-to” dentist in your area.

Dentists: Why Treat Sleep Apnea?

As a dentist have you ever thought about treating sleep apnea in your dental office? While it may seem like a long shot, dental sleep medicine continues to grow in importance each year because of a dentist’s unique ability to notice oral symptoms. Many patients who do not respond to traditional treatment will often benefit from oral appliances that are provided by dentists.

The Expertise

It is estimated that more than 18 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea. This happens when a person’s airway gets blocked while they are sleeping. Often, this will happen because a person is overweight and additional tissue thickens the wall of the windpipe, making it more difficult to keep open. And, sometimes it is because the throat muscles relax more than normal.  A long, bony neck can also make for a narrower airway, which leads to sleep apnea as well.

The most common treatment option is the use of a CPAP machine. However, many patients are non-compliant to this form of treatment and do not want to undergo surgery. When this occurs, their best option may be oral appliance therapy, which is provided by a dentist. By wearing an oral appliance, it opens the airway by pushing the lower jaw forward and is more comfortable than a CPAP machine.

The Opportunity to Complete Continuing Education

As a dentist you can easily learn more about treating sleep apnea through advanced education courses and lectures. For instance, as a dental sleep medicine expert, Dr. Mayoor Patel participates in numerous lectures a year to further improve dental practices and their treatment options.

While many dentists can treat sleep apnea, it is important to receive the best education and experience in order to properly treat your patients. Dentists see their patients twice a year and are given the unique opportunity to properly screen patients and recommend treatment long before they may ever visit their regular physician.

With the unique opportunity to diagnose and treat sleep apnea, as a dentist you should consider continuing your learning and expanding your practice. To read more about this “unique opportunity,” you can read an article by Dr. Patel on Sleep Review.

Contact Dr. Mayoor Patel for more information about continuing your education in Dental Sleep Medicine and understanding how you, a dentist, should look into treating sleep apnea in your dental practice.