Insomnia and sleep apnea can lead to premature birth, study says

With new research becoming available, it is important that we remain aware of new connections with sleep apnea. In a new study published in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, it was found that insomnia and sleep apnea can lead to premature births. And, from this, it augments the prevalence of serious health-related issues in preterm babies, such as cerebral palsy.

Premature births that occur before the 37th week of pregnancy are a major problem worldwide. About 15 million premature babies are born in the world every year, which places them at an increased risk of death from birth-related complications. Aside from cerebral palsy, preterm children can experience developmental disabilities, hearing impairments and other health problems because they were unable to fully develop in the womb.

The connection with sleep disorders

In an analysis of three million pregnant women from 2007 to 2012 in California, it showed that better sleep could minimize the number of premature births. Researchers analyzed anonymous records that contained medical history for these women about their pregnancies and the delivery of their babies.

It found that about 2,300 women had been diagnosed with a sleep disorder during pregnancy–insomnia and sleep apnea were the most frequent problems. From this information, it was found that insomnia increased the risk of preterm birth by 30 percent while sleep apnea increased it by 40 percent.

The study also found that 5.3 percent of women with sleep disorders gave birth before 34 weeks compared to 2.9 percent among women without sleep disorders. Understanding this relationship is important because there is a need for interventions to minimize preterm birth rates.

Unfortunately, many times pregnant women often go undiagnosed, which is why it is important to seek a diagnosis for proper care. Results from this study can help alert physicians and dentists to this potential danger.

 

Effect of CPAP use on blood pressure in patients with sleep apnea

The use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the most commonly used treatment option for sleep apnea. While it can be a successful form of treatment, not all patients wear the mask throughout the night. However, a new study published in the Journal of Hypertension shows that use of the CPAP machine did have a long-term impact on a patient’s health by reducing blood pressure.

With this information, we can further look at the long-term impact of oral appliance therapy for the health of our patients and a reduction in blood pressure and hypertension. It is apparent that the use of treatment of sleep apnea is key in protecting patients and their health in the long-run.  

The impact of treatment

This study looked to evaluate the impact of long-term use of CPAP on clinic and ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant hypertension (RHT) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). It observed 66 patients with RHT and moderate/severe OSA, using CPAP for at least a year. Clinic BP and 24-hour BP were obtained before and after follow-up.

The results showed that the average use of CPAP treatment was five hours per night with 78 percent using it at least four hours per night. There was a significant reduction of 24-hour and daytime systolic ambulatory BP. And controlled BP increased from 39 percent to 57 percent.

It was concluded that the treatment of OSA with long-term use of CPAP significantly reduces BP among patients with resistant hypertension. This is especially true with uncontrolled ambulatory BP at the baseline. What this means is that treatment is essential in not only improving OSA, but hypertension and BP too.

And while this study does not cover oral appliance therapy, we can assume the same can be said for continued use of an oral appliance. This is definitely something we need to keep an eye on and look further into. But it is clear that treatment of sleep apnea is essential to overall health and well-being.

Finish the Year Off on the Right Foot with Upcoming Lectures

With summer coming to an end, do you have the rest of your year planned out? We only have four months left before we reach the end of 2017, which means now is the time to get some extra lectures and classes in before the New Year.

 

To help you get a better picture for what is coming up in the next couple months I have listed my remaining lectures below:

September 29-30, 2017

Topic: Sleep & Pain Mini Residency Session 2

Location: Atlanta, GA

October 5-6, 2017

Topic: Dentistry and dental marketing International conference

Location: Las vegas, NV

October 13-14, 2017

Topic: Advancing your Dental Sleep Medicine Practice

Location: Atlanta, GA

October 19, 2017

Topic: ADA 2017 Meeting -Sleep Medicine Panel: Ask the Experts

Location: Atlanta, GA

October 27-29, 2017

Topic: Orofacial Pain Mini Residency Session 2

Location: Charlotte, NC

November 3-4, 2017

Topic: Dental Sleep Medicine and TMD

Location: London, England

November 10-11, 2017

Topic: Sleep, TMD, & Craniofacial Pain Symposium

Location: Las Vegas, NV

December 1-2, 2017

Topic: Sleep & Pain Mini Residency Session 3

Location: Atlanta, GA

December 8-9, 2017

Topic: Screening & Increasing Case Acceptance in Dental Sleep Medicine

Location: Jupiter, FL

There are a lot of great destinations in this list, with even more important topics to cover. I encourage you to attend a couple (or all) lectures before the end of the year. We have a lot to talk about that can help you continue to improve the services you offer your patients. I look forward to seeing some of you at an upcoming lecture!

 

Embrace Alternative Therapies Besides CPAP

This is important to think about: We are lying to ourselves if we don’t embrace alternative therapies other than continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for patients with sleep apnea. While CPAP therapy has been proven to be a successful form of treatment for patients with sleep apnea, it isn’t the only or best way for all patients.

As an alternative to CPAP therapy, oral appliance therapy is important to bring to the attention of your patients. By emphasizing how this alternative therapy option works, you can provide better treatment options for your patients. But, in order to successfully treat patients with oral appliances, I have a few things to point out.

Re-emphasize Bite Change

With your patients, it is important to re-emphasize the bite change that might occur. To help with this, ask the following questions:

  • Are you willing to give two minutes every morning?
  • Are you ok with your back molars not touching?

By asking these questions, you are setting your patients up for success. Oral appliances work, but many patients are hesitant or impatient. Asking if they are willing to give two minutes every morning to perform exercises after wearing the appliance at night will allow you to help them to ensure no bite changes occur.

The exercises work to keep their teeth aligned and bite unchanged. This is also important for the back molars. Use of the oral appliance can keep the back molars from touching if exercises are not completed. Treatment requires dedication from the patient and dentist.

Disruption in Veneers and Crowns

It is also important to note that if a patient has veneers or crowns and they pop off, that has nothing to do with the oral appliance. In fact, it has everything to do with how the treatment was conducted. Veneers or crowns that fall off or crack are typically due to not being cemented in place properly. This has nothing to do with the oral appliance.

Document Everything

This might be the most important part about treatment for your patients–not only because it helps the patient, but because it can protect your office down the road. I cannot emphasize this enough, but you must:

Document everything you say and that it did take place.

I have made this sentence bold while standing on its own because it needs to be said and engrained in your mind for every patient that walks through your office doors. Document everything. And I do mean everything. By including every detail, you can ensure proper treatment is conducted and your patients are made aware of what you said.