Help your office with Dr. Patel’s educational book on sleep apnea

In March of 2015 I teamed up with Dr. Dillard to create Freedom from CPAP: Sleep Apnea Hurts, the Cure Doesn’t Have To. Together we wanted to educate dentists and other physicians on sleep apnea and the options available for treatment. 

The availability of this educational book on sleep apnea can help dental teams educate their patients on sleep apnea and proper treatment. By helping your patients–and your team–better understand how oral appliance therapy can help, we can take the next steps toward improving the overall health of these individuals. 

If you haven’t picked up this educational book on sleep apnea, I highly suggest purchasing at least one copy now. And, if you have already purchased the book,  you can take the next steps toward a better understanding of sleep apnea and the treatment options available. 

Here are a few ways you can use this educational book to help your patients and staff in the area of sleep apnea. 

Provide sleep apnea education

The main purpose of this sleep apnea book is to get your patients “in the know” about sleep apnea. We work to inform you and your patients on sleep apnea and what it is–because not everyone understands this often debilitating sleep disorder. By understanding sleep apnea, your patients can take proactive steps toward better health. 

Whether you sell this book to your patient, or give it to them, allow your patient to read this book for further knowledge of sleep apnea and treatment options available. The goal of this book is to educate patients on what sleep apnea is and what treatment options, other than CPAP, are currently available for comfortable care.

Inform your dental team

Freedom from CPAP: Sleep Apnea Hurts, the Cure Doesn’t Have To can also be a beneficial tool for your office to read themselves while also sharing the information with patients. Supply this book for your team, or have them purchase the book to improve their knowledge and understanding of sleep apnea. 

While it is important for patients to understand this condition, it is even more important for your dental office to know sleep apnea, what it is and how to treat it. Knowledgeable staff members go a long way in helping with diagnosis and treatment of your patients.
Take charge of your office and your patients’ health by providing, “Freedom from CPAP: Sleep Apnea Hurts, the Cure Doesn’t Have To.” The more your patients and staff know, the better they are equipped to take the next steps in sleep apnea recognition and treatment. Click here to purchase Freedom from CPAP: Sleep Apnea Hurts, the Cure Doesn’t Have To.

Work with physicians to treat craniofacial pain

 

With such a large portion of the population not getting the right treatment for what are often debilitating disorders, there is an incredible need for dentists who understand the neuroanatomical relationship within the cranio-cervical area and how to diagnose common pain complaints in the head and neck. This is why it is important to work with physicians to treat craniofacial pain.

Treating craniofacial pain is a team effort, with the patient’s Dentist, ENT, Neurologist, Physiatrist, Physical Therapist, and Psychiatrist all potentially playing a role in diagnosis and treatment. A dentist must understand what physicians do in a diagnostic workup and treatment and when it’s necessary to refer out in order to truly understand their role and fulfill their duties in patient care and establish referral relationships across various physician specialties.

By learning how to diagnose and treat craniofacial pain, dentists gain a great power to change their patients’ lives. With great power comes great responsibility for the proper diagnosis and management of pain in and around the mouth, face and neck. 

Create a working relationship

Many patients will find themselves in a neurological, primary care, chiropractic, pain management or an ENT’s office, but that may not always be the best place. For example, undiagnosed TMD may be mistaken for different ailments, as it can often stump many medical practitioners with the vast crossover of symptoms patients experience. 

A patient might complain of TMJ pain, but in reality they are suffering from a disease or infection of the ear, nose or throat. It is also common for a patient to complain of ear pain, but have the pain really be related to an affected TMJ. When this occurs, patients might be in the wrong medical office seeking treatment, or the clinician is frustrated that their prescribed therapy based on symptoms has not helped in resolving a patient’s complaints. 

Whether it is neurological or sinus related, you want your patients to get the best care available, and that means joining forces with other medical professionals. From neurologists and otolaryngologists to family practitioners, it is important to create a working relationship with each medical practitioner in order to discuss or refer for diagnosis and management of your patients when further assistance is needed.

Whether it is ear, dental or head related, a working relationship with the medical professionals in your community is essential in providing proper treatment for your patients! They will thank you in the end.

Hypertension and cognitive decline: Implications of obstructive sleep apnea

In the general population we see a significant amount of people with hypertension and dementia. Hypertension has been shown to be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s dementia and vascular dementia, but it is also strongly connected with obstructive sleep apnea. Recent evidence suggests that sleep apnea is linked with cognitive decline and dementia. 

This proves that it is possible that sleep apnea is the final common pathway linking hypertension to the development of dementia. And since sleep apnea is readily treatable, such therapy could potentially delay or prevent the onset of dementia. 

What are the connections?

Recently, hypertension has been recognized as a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia. Both of these conditions are also commonly seen in the general population. However, a significant number of patients with hypertension remain untreated, which can increase their risk for developing long-term negative health consequences. 

Sleep disordered breathing, or sleep apnea, is also highly prevalent in the general population and is associated with several adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Sleep apnea has been linked to incident and prevalent hypertension in various studies. It is also thought that sympathetic overactivity leads to the development of high blood pressure in these individuals. It is possible that sleep apnea contributes to the increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia seen in those with hypertension. 

Treat patients with sleep apnea now

This means it is important as dentists to provide proper treatment for our patients with sleep apnea. Through oral appliance therapy, you can take the next step toward improving your patients’ overall health and well-being. 

For this reason it is extremely important to properly screen your patients each time they visit your office. In doing so, you may be the first to notice a problem. From there you can refer your patient to a sleep physician for further diagnosis and treatment planning. 

It is our duty as dentists to continue to provide for our patients, especially knowing the connections between sleep apnea and other conditions.